366 Days with Duolingo

I am not the most disciplined person in the world. I tended to start off very excited about a new project and then lose interest about 75% of the way through.

I’ve just completed a year (a leap year even) of doing Duolingo every day. I started Duolingo two years ago, 10 January 2015, after trying a number of other online websites both Free and paid. I had a dream of learning French but wasn’t sure how to get there. Now I can kind of read French Newspapers and can often understand some French conversations. I do have a way to go. But I don’t think I would have come this far without Duolingo.

I have had a dream of learning French for years, but wasn’t sure how to get there. Now I can read and understand French Newspapers and can often understand some French conversations. I do have a way to go. But I don’t think I would have come this far without Duolingo.

Duolingo is Free so this is not a sponsored add. I also use other paid websites including Rocket French, however, it is Duolingo that I come to first every day.

I have written about Duolingo before. But this is the one year mark of a perfect streak so I have something to celebrate. To tell you the truth I did miss a few days from time to time. But Duolingo lets you use your acquired points, called Lingots, to get a one-day streak protection, so that your score doesn’t go back to zero. It is very disheartening to see your score go back to zero, but then I have to remind myself that I am here to learn French and not run up a score.

Interestingly enough it’s the score that keeps me coming back. I’m not overly competitive but I use to be a hardcore gamer back when “Doom” and “Duke Nukem” were new. So there is something about Duolingo’s ‘gamification’ that appeals to me on a deep level.

Steve Kaufman creator of the LingQ.com website.

I guess, by keeping score, it makes me feel like I’m making progress even when I find the language frustrating. But as the experts like Steve Kaufmann say, language learning is about spending time daily with the language. Duolingo has done that for me. It has made me sit down each day and just do a little bit. As you can see from my

As you can see from my screenshot at the top of the page, I am only doing Ten words a day right now. I was doing thirty, but then Duolingo ran out of French and I had to do Italian for a while.

Duolingo’s lessons expire from time to time, so you need to revisit them. So I am back to doing French. I’m doing only 10 again to pace myself. And by only doing 10 a day it gives more time for my completed lessons to expire. I’m doing my real language learning at Rock french these days.

If I were to list the things Duolingo has done for me. They would be, (in no particular order).

  • Made French Learning a habit. (Habits are very important)
  • Kept score – which made me protective of my score. Which made me come back.
  • Gave me a variety of different styles of lessons.
  • Slowly built up my vocabulary over the last two years.
  • Kept me learning during the times I was really over the whole thing. There are some weeks that I just go in a do the minimum. But if you can get through these times you will make progress.
  • Gave me a sense of completion. Last October I completed the last French modules, I felt like I had done something. Yesterday when I completed 365 days and today when I did the whole leap year I felt that way again. As silly as these little feelings of pride are, they are very important in the overall progression of learning French.

I don’t think Duolingo will teach you French, but it will build your vocabulary and your confidence and it’s a great place to start.

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